PDF: Britain's Biggest Brands 2017

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Where to find Britain’s biggest brands

Actimel …. 34
Activia …. 28
Air Wick …. 32
Alpro …. 27
Anchor …. 32
Andrex …. 14
Ariel …. 26
Arla …. 20
Aunt Bessie’s …. 28
Ben & Jerry’s …. 34
Birds Eye …. 12
Bisto …. 30
Bold …. 32
Buxton …. 33
Cadbury …. 17
Cadbury Dairy Milk …. 12
Cadbury Twirl …. 34
Cathedral City …. 18
Chicago Town …. 32
Coca-Cola …. 10
Comfort …. 24
Dairylea …. 34
Dettol …. 33
Dolmio …. 30
Doritos …. 25
Evian …. 27
Fairy …. 17
Fanta …. 28
Felix …. 18
Finish …. 30
Flora …. 28
Galaxy …. 20
Ginsters …. 33
Haribo …. 24
Heinz Beanz …. 23
Heinz Sauces …. 23
Heinz Soup …. 25
Hellmann’s …. 32
Hovis …. 18
Innocent …. 20
Irn-Bru …. 33
Jacob’s …. 25
John West …. 25
Kenco …. 30
Kettle …. 33
Kinder …. 30
Kingsmill …. 17
Kit Kat …. 26
Kleenex …. 33
Lenor …. 28
Lindt Lindor …. 32
Lucozade …. 14
Lurpak …. 17
Magnum …. 27
Maltesers …. 25
Mars …. 33
Maynards Bassetts …. 30
McCain …. 17
McCoy’s …. 33
McVitie’s …. 12
Monster Energy …. 28
Mr Kipling …. 28
Müller Corner …. 24
Müller Light …. 26
Napolina …. 30
Nescafé …. 14
Old El Paso …. 34
Pedigree …. 23
Pepsi …. 14
Persil …. 20
PG Tips …. 32
Philadelphia …. 34
Pizza Express …. 32
Plenty …. 34
Pot Noodle …. 34
Princes …. 26
Pringles …. 23
Quaker Oats …. 30
Quorn …. 28
Red Bull …. 18
Ribena …. 28
Richmond …. 30
Robinsons …. 18
Rowntree’s …. 34
Schweppes …. 30
Surf …. 32
Thorntons …. 33
Tropicana …. 20
Twinings …. 32
Uncle Ben’s …. 26
Velvet …. 33
Volvic …. 24
Walkers …. 12
Warburtons …. 11
Weetabix …. 27
WeightWatchers …. 34
Whiskas …. 24
Wrigley’s Extra …. 23
Yeo Valley …. 28
Young’s …. 27

I’m not sure who would be most offended, Johnny Rotten or Nigel Farage. But there’s a surprising similarity between the two. Both punk and Brexit were protest movements. Punk’s explosion 40 years ago was a reaction to the economics andpolitics of the time. Agree with Farage or not, so was Brexit.Now the 52%’s voice has been heard, it’s not just the ‘political élite’ that have been shaken up. So have Britain’s Biggest Grocery Brands. They’re near-unanimous in their warnings oflooming inflation. Shrinkflation is widely associated with Brexit,but, as Mondelez points out, the cost of cocoa has increasedby 50% in the past four years (p6). As the pound weakens, it will only get worse. Only this week Mars president Fiona Dawsonwarned of dramatic price rises to its bestselling products,including a 30% tariff on confectionery, 20% on animal products,15% on cereals and more than 10% on fish and fruit. Thereturn of trade barriers would threaten currently integrated supplychains, she says.

Of course, Brexit is only half the story here. This ranking isbased on sales from last year [52 w/e 31 December 2016], whendeflation still ruled, as the sector’s old guard responded to thediscounters by slashing prices: 49 of the top 100’s average pricesare down; 62 have lost value. Some have failed to do their job forretailers. That is, serve as a counterbalance to own label by convincingshoppers to pay more with compelling NPD, marketing,etc. Princes (44) has lost more than a fifth of its sales due to aslew of delistings and price cuts; so have Velvet (86) and Anchor(76), to name a few. Price might help win volumes from fellowbrands, but it’s a fight they won’t win with own-label suppliers.

The big four face a similar fight with the discounters. They need powerful brands in that fight. Brands such as Innocent(24), which, after years of intense price competition in the juicesector, has racked up the year’s fifth greatest gain with canny NPD tapping demand for healthy, functional products with ‘natural’cues. The same can be said of the year’s fastest and thirdfastest growers, Arla (21) and Alpro (46). Of course, price is stillcrucial for these brands, but even more so is what they stand for.

In this environment, prices rising again may actually be welcome.But all of the top 100 will need to work out exactly what itis they stand for. And for those brands whose only answer is lowprices, the future is pretty vacant. Rotten, in fact.

Contributors

● Supplement editor:Rob Brown

● Sub-editor: Kit Davies

● Designer: Beth Johnson

● Writers: Alec Mattinson, Amy North, Alex Wright,Beth Gault, Carina Perkins,Daniel Selwood, Ed Devlin,Ellis Hawthorne, Kevin White,Megan Tatum, Nick Hughes

 

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